Archive

Category Archives for "Posts by Daisy"
9

Hillbilly Hydrotherapy

In mid April, just two weeks prior to the AKC USA AWC Team Tryouts, Frodo and I went from being super prepared and ready to rock and roll to…rehab. Frodo suffered a traumatic tear of his CCL on a Thursday, April 13, and had a TPLO Friday, April 14. In the flurry of activity that followed, as well as me being shell shocked about the injury, the surgery, the rehab, and being knocked off that high place of being ready to rock and roll at tryouts, Chispa didn't poop for nearly a week and ended up at the emergency clinic herself. During this time, she had a persistent lameness that was troubling me. Xrays revealed it was not shoulder OCD – something nobody wants, but in the grand scheme of things is fixable. Further digging, and a CT scan revealed fragmented medial coronoid processes on both elbows. So, a month after Frodo's TPLO, Chispa had bilateral arthroscopy on her elbows, and fragment removal on the left elbow. The fragments were in situ on both elbows, and it took some prying to get the clinical (left) fragment out. Because of the difficulty on the left, and given that the right fragment, also in situ, did not seem to want to budge, the right elbow was left alone. No joint incongruency was detected in either elbow. I have no idea if she'll be able to do agility, but I suppose I will give it a go, and see where we end up. Frodo's prognosis is much clearer; he'll probably be back in action in just a few months, more energized than he's ever been before, and certainly, I'll be more eager than I've ever been to get back in the ring with him.

In the meantime, I have two dogs who need rehab. I live way out in the country, and have access to a lot of great information, so the only thing beyond that is to just do it. I'm not in to driving in to downtown anywhere to get dogs to an underwater treadmill, but I do recognize the importance and benefits to hydrotherapy, whether it be ice packs, heat packs, swimming, or walking in water (cold or warm). I have an appointment with a rehab specialist in Seattle mid-June, but until then, I'll be DIY-ing it with the information I've got.

If your'e curious as to the rehab protocol I'm following with Frodo (who is at the 6-week mark this week and has his follow up Xrays!!), it's a combination of these two:

Top Dog Health – TPLO Guide – This guide is a free download, and I also get weekly emails with videos of each exercise. I'm pretty impressed with how thorough it is. It's fairly conservative, and I've been moving a little faster than this guide spells out, but then again, Frodo was in top condition prior to the injury, not overweight, and I have access to a lot of fitness equipment and information – this guide as well as the next one is clearly aimed at a pet audience. I'm sure that veterinary professionals and rehab professionals are cringing right now, but I'm ok with that – and for sure you can reserve the right to blame my use of this and other DIY resources on any rehab failures we may encounter 🙂

MedVetForPets – TPLO Guide – I can't remember how I found this one, but it's also pretty thorough, and includes more exercises with a little faster progression. I like that I can look at the two together and get a rough idea of how to proceed.

Now, I recognize that these PDF files are not a substitute for an individualized rehab plan, and so, like I mentioned before, Frodo, Chispa, and myself will be heading up to Seattle in mid-June to spend some time with a rehab certified veterinarian who also does agility to get some plans for moving forward.

Hillbilly Hydrotherapy

That brings us to Hillbilly Hydrotherapy. With Frodo, since there was no previous ligament disease, and it was a traumatic event, his prognosis for healing is excellent. Getting back to full activity is mostly a matter of building back muscle, once the Tibia has healed. And, building back muscle to the point we were at prior to the incident will be determined by how much muscle wasting occurs while that Tibia is healing. So, I knew I wanted to get him walking in the water as soon as I could. I knew I wanted to be able to do it without driving an hour each way multiple times a week, daily if possible. With Solar, who had a soft tissue injury in 2014, I just used an inflatable above ground pool and walked in circles with him, but I didn't like how he could swing his rear out and pivot, rather than tracking with front and rear together.

When I saw this set up posted by somebody on FB, I knew I wanted to build something like it myself, with a few modifications. Here's my setup (click the image to enlarge):

Want to read the rest of this article? This content is free, but you'll need to sign up to access it first! Once you've signed up, you'll receive an email with your login credentials, and you can log in and return to this page to view! If you're already a student and know your password you can log in immediately 🙂

On disappointment

This past weekend, Frodo and I headed to Perry, Georgia for the 2017 AKC Agility National Championships. As in the past when I've gone to Crufts, the NAC follows almost immediately after. This year, NAC marked the end of a 2.5 week stay in Germany, followed by Crufts, and then, Perry, GA. Frodo and I have come a long way since our first AKC Nationals together, in Reno, NV, back in 2015. We weren't much of a team, although we did manage to have a good run in I think Jumpers with Weaves. We didn't know each other very well, and I was still deeply disappointed to have lost Solar as my running mate when he was still arguably in his prime.

I didn't go to AKC NAC in 2016, for various reasons, but I'd been looking forward to the event this past weekend, because at this point, Frodo and I are a good working team. We still have places to go with respect to our development, we're not finished growing yet as a team, but we're a pretty smoothly functioning team at this point nonetheless.

I'm fairly objective about our odds most of the time, and in my mind, our odds this year were pretty good, given the data that I had going in to the event. And at the event, in the International Sweepstakes Round, we put down a great run, coming in third by just a few fractions of a second. I'd wanted to do well, although winning would have meant turning down a spot to go to the European Open in Italy. Why turn it down? Last year at the European Open, Frodo had a hard time with the crowds ringside – he's much better at big stadium style events where there's more distance between the noisy crowd and the ring. So, while it's possible he'd be better this year, I didn't feel like it was in line with my goals. In any case, ISC was perfect – we did really well, but we didn't win, and so I didn't have to say no, which is chronically difficult for me.

Want to read the rest of this article? This content is free, but you'll need to sign up to access it first! Once you've signed up, you'll receive an email with your login credentials, and you can log in and return to this page to view! If you're already a student and know your password you can log in immediately 🙂

International Course Challenge: 2-14-2017

Here's the setup, course map, and analysis for the course that we ran in class at Clear Mind Agility this week. Enjoy!

Want to read the rest of this article? This content is free, but you'll need to sign up to access it first! Once you've signed up, you'll receive an email with your login credentials, and you can log in and return to this page to view! If you're already a student and know your password you can log in immediately 🙂

International Course Challenge 2-3-2017

Here's the setup, course map, and analysis for the course that we ran in class at Clear Mind Agility this week. Enjoy!

Want to read the rest of this article? This content is free, but you'll need to sign up to access it first! Once you've signed up, you'll receive an email with your login credentials, and you can log in and return to this page to view! If you're already a student and know your password you can log in immediately 🙂

International Course Challenge, 1-23-2017

Here's the set up, course map, and analysis for the course that we ran in class at Clear Mind Agility this week. Enjoy!

Want to read the rest of this article? This content is free, but you'll need to sign up to access it first! Once you've signed up, you'll receive an email with your login credentials, and you can log in and return to this page to view! If you're already a student and know your password you can log in immediately 🙂

International Course Challenge, 1-1-2017

Here's the set up, course map, and analysis for the course that we ran in class at Clear Mind Agility last week. Enjoy!

Want to read the rest of this article? This content is free, but you'll need to sign up to access it first! Once you've signed up, you'll receive an email with your login credentials, and you can log in and return to this page to view! If you're already a student and know your password you can log in immediately 🙂

Course challenge for the week of 12-27-2016 at Clear Mind Agility

Here's the set up, course map, and analysis for the course that we ran in class at Clear Mind Agility last week of 2016. Enjoy!

Would you like to read the rest of this article? This content is free, but you'll need to sign up to access it first! Once you've signed up, you'll receive an email with your login credentials, and you can log in and return to this page to view! If you're already a student and know your password you can log in immediately 🙂

International Course Challenge – December 15, 2016

Here's the set up, course map, and analysis for the course that we ran in class at Clear Mind Agility the week of December 15, 2016. Enjoy!

Want to read the rest of this article? This content is free, but you'll need to sign up to access it first! Once you've <a href=”https://classroom.daisypeel.com/sign-up/”>signed up</a>, you'll receive an email with your login credentials, and you can log in and return to this page to view! If you're already a student and know your password you can log in immediately 🙂

Course map with focus areas – click to enlarge

16

Vocabulary Reboot Part I: Threadles

I've been thinking a lot about threadles lately. It's something that historically, I've handled my way out of, rather than training, for the most part. I love training. I went to ALL of the Bob Bailey Chicken Camps, and I loved all of them. But for some reason, I just never viewed threadles as a training challenge. Insert maniacal laughter here.

I'm also thinking a lot about running contacts right now. Way back in 2008, when I started training Solar's running contacts, before the days of online classes, and when NObody had thought to use FOOD or a remote controlled treat dispenser to get going, I figured it out largely by myself, along with Silvia Trkman's writeup of the process she followed on her website. Her writeup was largely conceptual, and frankly, I think that was better for me to have read than a step by step process.

The concept of the process to be followed, along with my mind spinning with ideas, fresh out of Chicken Camp, meant that I really tried hard not only to be a good trainer, but also, to fully understand the concept of what I was training, as well as the ramifications of any ripples that might affect other training I was doing (there are, and JUMP training ripples in to running contacts, but, more on that later).

So, with my puppy, I expect that when she is old enough to step in to the arena to tackle an FCI style course, she will need a thorough understanding of landing side approaches.

What is a landing side approach?

First off, I think we would be wise to discontinue use of the term ‘threadle', and instead, adopt a term that more accurately describes the type of challenge a threadle represents. So, I'm no longer going to use that word (plus my autocorrect hates it). Instead, I'm going to use the term landing side approach.

Want to read the rest of this article? This content is free, but you'll need to sign up to access it first! Once you've signed up, you'll receive an email with your login credentials, and you can log in and return to this page to view! If you're already a student and know your password you can log in immediately 🙂

Wow, it’s HOT! What now?

Written by guest blogger and student Diana Dickinson – you can visit her blog, which she posts on regularly, HERE.

effectiveness-clipart-thermometer-clip-art-172x300Every agility competitor I know worries about getting dehydrated when it's hot. We spend all day at a trial, and it gets hot in the sun, or in the arena, and we drink lots of water and encourage our dogs to drink lots of water. Some of us look for salty foods to replace the salt as we sweat. After getting muscle cramps that woke me up during the night after a long weekend's trialing a few year's back, I decided I needed to better understand my body's needs.

Like so many things about agility, it turns out it's not that simple. Drinking water is good, but drinking too much water is bad, and drinking too little water is bad. Both problems can cause muscle cramps, too. Replacing electrolytes (salts) lost through sweat is good, but too much is bad and too little is bad. Balance turns out to be key. Based on everything I've read, drinking too much plain water without also consuming some electrolytes can lead to problems—just like drinking too little water.

Want to read the rest of this article? This content is free, but you'll need to sign up to access it first! Once you've signed up, you'll receive an email with your login credentials, and you can log in and return to this page to view! If you're already a student and know your password you can log in immediately 🙂