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Chispa and I just got back from Turku, Finland, here we competed at the World Agility Championship for Team USA. It was an amazing competition, and although we didn't come home with a handful of trophies and ribbons (or even one!), we did learn a lot and had a lot of fun. She did amazingly well for such a youngster; at only three, she's just a bit older than Solar was at his first World Championship back in 2010, and the courses and training required are far more complicated now than they were back then!

Below you'll find the course maps from the event, as well as my video analysis for each run, including my thoughts about the course as I watched it being built, and after I walked it, as well as my thoughts on how each run went with Chispa, and how I'd do things differently or better! Each video is 15-20 minutes long, and you can watch it here OR download it to watch later (or both!).

Feel free to leave a comment or ask questions using the comment form at the bottom of this page!

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Click Here to Leave a Comment Below 20 comments
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mweir13 - a couple of months ago

LOVE IT FAB

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    Daisy Peel
    Daisy Peel - a couple of months ago

    Glad you enjoyed the reviews!

    Reply
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jasmer8 - a couple of months ago

Learning so much from this analysis. Thank you Daisy!

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    Daisy Peel
    Daisy Peel - a couple of months ago

    I’m glad you found them useful!

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DianeKrumme - a couple of months ago

Amazing, love the analysis.

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    Daisy Peel
    Daisy Peel - a couple of months ago

    Excellent, I’m glad you enjoyed them!

    Reply
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AngelaSutton - a couple of months ago

Many thanks !!! Such fun to see how you planned for good and efficient lines and ability to get where you needed to downstream!!

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    Daisy Peel
    Daisy Peel - a couple of months ago

    Planning isn’t always reality, but yes, I try ๐Ÿ™‚

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AngelaSutton - a couple of months ago

Re teeter flyoff, test whether the issue recurs when you put a teeter parallel and adjacent to the ring boundary. I have seen dog after dog mistake teeter for the dogwalk in local competition in that scenario because they are so used to the DW being placed along one side of the ring.

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    Daisy Peel
    Daisy Peel - a couple of months ago

    Yes, that’s also a thing that happens, although less so at these big FCI events, since there’s so much room where the dogwalk can go ๐Ÿ™‚

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LizDole - a couple of months ago

Daisy, I really appreciated your thorough and honest analyses. Beautiful threadedโ€”maybe you should write a book. ๐Ÿคฃ๐Ÿคฃ Great job at AWC with your Chispa. ๐Ÿพ

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    Daisy Peel
    Daisy Peel - a couple of months ago

    LizDole Hmm, maybe I will! What should it be about? ๐Ÿ˜‚

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      LizDole - a couple of months ago

      I think that Landing Side Approaches is a catchy phrase, donโ€™t you think? ๐Ÿคฃ

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VivienneBoogaard - a couple of months ago

Daisy thank you so much for this detailed commentary and explanations that are so clear. You make me want to try and lay these courses out but I don’t have the space, so I will try sections. I love how you don’t put your ego into this activity and you show me that my way of doing “what if” alternatives when I walk is not just indecision on my part (most people have told me to make a plan and stick with it, but things happen…). Thank you so very much, love this. Just wish the maps had measurements on them but I assume the weaves are ~ std length in the diagram and I can use that to measure around and make a grid. Congratulations on great runs with Chispa!

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    Daisy Peel
    Daisy Peel - a couple of months ago

    VivienneBoogaard you’re very welcome. I enjoy doing these analyses, I should do them more often. It’s a good exercise for me as well as for those who get to watch the videos. As for the maps not having measurements, here’s a simple (sort of) way to figure things out – I have an ‘overlay’ program on my mac that lets me put an image in to a window and then set the opacity so you can see through it. Then, I’ll open up my course design software underneath it. Usually, if you match up the size of an obstacle like the weave poles or the dogwalk, you can get the scale right for the rest of the course, usually. I’ll do one of the courses for you now so you can see ๐Ÿ™‚ Thanks for the nudge, this is a good video to send to my email list as well!

    https://vimeo.com/363138379

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Kerry Levin - a couple of months ago

Hi Daisy! So far Iโ€™ve just watched your review of Indiv jumping. Can you please explain in more detail what the handling was for #19? I saw other teams do the same thing. Lots of cheering for you and Chispa when you nailed that one! Nice run and analysis.

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    Daisy Peel
    Daisy Peel - a couple of months ago

    Thanks Kerry, good question. My original plan was to send to the takeoff side of 19 and then scoot around the right wing and do a blind, but as soon as I did the front/blind at 17 I knew that wasn’t going to happen. So instead, I did what amounts to a send to the backside plus a rear cross. I sent to the backside and then cued a left turn with my verbal and an arm cue, and then slipped behind for the rear ๐Ÿ™‚

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Shela - a couple of months ago

Thank you so much for doing the analysis. It is way above my pay grade, but wow, it will sure help me in how I look at a course from now on. Thank you for giving us the opportunity to learn.

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Giuliana Lund - a couple of months ago

Thanks so much for this super analysis and congrats on some great runs! In the Individual Agility run you mention dogs missing the wall jump due to curving in off the threadle on the previous jump. (And this tendency to curve back towards the handler on a threadle may also have contributed to Chispa’s bar on the way to the teeter as she realized a bit late she needed to turn away from you a bit there). This is an issue I have had with Ruki. I know a big part of the problem is me hanging back to be certain of the threadle, causing her to finish ahead of me so I can’t push her line properly. But your drawing gave me a thought, or question I guess. Would you ever deliberately position yourself wider to initiate the threadle in order to give yourself room to show a push line towards the far wing? Or would you be as close as possible to the jump and just leave sooner / run faster to get around the wing ahead of the dog?

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    Daisy Peel
    Daisy Peel - a couple of months ago

    You’re quite welcome, Giuliana, I enjoy doing this sort of thing. And yes, I totally agree on number two in that last run – so many dogs were crashing the wing or dropping the bar on that jump because of just what you describe. I wasn’t sure whether or not to do the push or the threadle there, and ultimately decided on the threadle to be in a better position for what came after the seesaw. But in hindsight, doing it as a push and staying wide of the jump to make it clear she had to go around me as I did the blind may have saved the bar, although it would have put me behind for the sequence to the poles. NONE of that went how I walked it, I never ever thought Chispa would make the weave entry with me so far away, but if I’d had known that, I would have stayed much closer to the seesaw and not gotten the flyoff! She’s capable of more than I give her credit for sometimes ๐Ÿ™‚

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